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Thread: Blue States in Debt

  1. #11
    Havakasha is offline
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    The title of your thread is BLUE states in debt. Enough said.
    And i just like to argue.

    YOU REALLY dont get it. Federal funds are redistributed from larger
    states to smaller states. Arent you upset about this redistribution of
    wealth?

    Time to move on to more important matters.

    United States Federal Tax Dollars: Federal Tax Payments Per State

    The federal taxes paid per capita vary widely by state. New England has some of the largest tax payments per capita while the states with the lowest per-capita payments are scattered elsewhere in the country.

    The place with highest federal tax payments per capita is Washington, D.C., with $11,582. The state with the second-highest federal tax payments is Connecticut with $11,522 per capita. The state with the third-highest federal tax payments is New Jersey with $9,902 per capita. The fourth-highest federal tax payments per capita come from Massachusetts with $9,792. The state with fifth-highest federal tax payments per capita is Maryland with $8,812.

    The state with the lowest federal tax payments is Mississippi with $4,281 per capita. The state with the second-lowest federal tax payments is Louisiana with $4,565 per capita. The state with the third-lowest federal tax payments per capita is West Virginia with $4,861. The state with the fourth-lowest federal tax payments per capita is Arkansas with $5,030. The state with the fifth-lowest federal tax payments per capita is New Mexico with $5,153.

    Federal Tax Allotments Per State

    The place with highest federal tax allotments per capita is Washington, D.C., with $65,109. The state with the second-highest federal tax allotments per capita is Alaska with $13,950. The state with the third-highest federal tax allotments per capita is Virginia $16,610. The state with the fourth-highest federal tax allotments per capita is Maryland with $11,956. The state with the fifth-highest federal tax allotments per capita is New Mexico with $10,733.

    The state with the lowest federal tax allotments per capita is Nevada with $5,889. The state with the second-lowest federal tax allotments per capita is Utah with $5,944. The state with the third-lowest federal tax allotments per capita is Wisconsin with $6,113. The state with the fourth-lowest federal tax allotments per capita is Oregon with $6,285. The state with the fifth-lowest federal tax allotments per capita is Illinois with $6,334.

    Federal Tax Dollars Received Per Tax Dollars Paid Per State

    New Jersey receives 0.61 for each tax dollar paid. Nevada receives 0.65 per tax dollar paid. Connecticut receives 0.69 for each tax dollar paid New Hampshire receives 0.71 for each tax dollar it pays. Minnesota receives 0.72 per tax dollar paid. Illinois receives 0.75 for each tax dollar it pays. Delaware receives 0.77 per tax dollar paid. California receives 0.78 per tax dollar paid.

    New York receives 0.79 per tax dollar paid. Colorado receives 0.81 per tax dollar paid. Massachusetts receives 0.82 for each tax dollar it pays. Wisconsin receives 0.86 per tax dollar paid. Washington receives 0.88 per tax dollar paid. Michigan receives 0.92 per tax dollar paid. Texas receives 0.94 per tax dollar paid. Florida receives 0.97 for each tax dollar it pays. Oregon receives 0.98 per tax dollar paid. Rhode Island receives 1.00 per tax dollar paid. Georgia receives 1.01 per tax dollar paid.

    Indiana receives 1.05 for each tax dollar it pays. Ohio receives 1.05 per tax dollar paid. Pennsylvania receives 1.07 per tax dollar paid. Utah receives 1.07 per tax dollar paid. North Carolina receives 1.08 per tax dollar paid. Vermont receives 1.08 for each tax dollar it pays. Iowa receives 1.10 per tax dollar paid. Nebraska receives 1.10 per tax dollar paid. Wyoming receives 1.11 per tax dollar paid. Kansas receives 1.12 for each tax dollar it pays.

    Arizona receives 1.19 per tax dollar paid. Idaho receives 1.21 per tax dollar paid. Tennessee receives 1.27 per tax dollar paid. Maryland receives 1.30 for each tax dollar it pays. Missouri receives 1.32 per tax dollar paid. South Carolina receives 1.35 per tax dollar paid. Oklahoma receives 1.36 per tax dollar paid. Arkansas receives 1.41 per tax dollar paid. Maine receives 1.41 per tax dollar paid. Hawaii receives 1.44 per tax dollar paid. Montana receives 1.47 per tax dollar paid.

    Kentucky receives 1.51 per tax dollar paid. Virginia receives 1.51 per tax dollar paid. South Dakota receives 1.53 per tax dollar paid. Alabama receives 1.66 per tax dollar paid. North Dakota receives 1.68 per tax dollar paid. West Virginia receives 1.76 per tax dollar paid. Louisiana receives 1.78 per tax dollar paid. Alaska receives 1.84 per tax dollar paid. Mississippi receives 2.02 per tax dollar paid. New Mexico receives 2.03 per tax dollar paid.

    Posted by: admin Tags: federal tax dollars, tax payments, united states
    related visualeconomic articles



    Visual Economics: United States Federal Tax Dollars - VisualEconomics.com http://www.visualeconomics.com/unite...#ixzz15SOpmVmr
    http://www.visualeconomics.com/
    Last edited by Havakasha; 11-16-2010 at 10:18 AM.

  2. #12
    SiriuslyLong is offline
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    "YOU REALLY dont get it. Federal funds are redistributed from larger
    states to smaller states. Arent you upset about this redistribution of
    wealth?"

    LOL good one. Federal Funds are distributed by the federal government to the individual states based on any number of factors. As you would say, "it's complicated". It is erronious to say that funds are redistributed from larger states to smaller states. CA does not write checks to AK, do they?

  3. #13
    Havakasha is offline
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    You really dont read the articles i post do you.
    I said the Federal govt takes money from larger states and distributes them to smaller states.
    Didnt say anything about state to state check writing. Lol.

    This is an article about distribution of federal spending on a number of levels.

    Red States, Blue States and the Distribution of Federal Spending
    Mar 31st, 2010 by jfrankel |
    April 1 is Census Day. Evidently Glenn Beck and Michele Bachmann have been encouraging Americans to boycott the census — to refuse to fill out the whole form. This protest follows from their small government ideology.

    I am not always sure what they, or Republicans, or Tea Party participants mean by small government. They say they want a government that intervenes less in the economic sphere. Perhaps they don’t like the idea that the census numbers are used, among other things, to determine the allocation of federal spending across states, because they don’t think it is the business of the government to redistribute income. That is “socialism.” Even “Stalinism.”

    A virtue of the Tea Party movement is that many of its members are engaging in national politics for the first time. It occurred to me that they might be able to use some help figuring out the lay of the land, and so I thought I would pursue a little research on their behalf. The question is geographical redistribution: which states receive subsidies from the federal government, and which other states are taxed to provide those subsidies. One might be able to sympathize with the feeling of those living in the heartland of the country that they should not have to subsidize the northeastern states through, for example, federal housing programs. True, the cost of housing, food, and other living expenses is much higher in the coastal cities, compared to the South or Midwest; but it isn’t the job of the federal government to smooth out geographical variation in real income. Furthermore the coastal residents could always move if they don’t like their high cost of living. Given the big budget deficit problem that we will have to solve in the near future, knowing which states are receiving more than their fair share of handouts should help us know where to cut spending.

    The accompanying chart contains 50 data points, one for each state. The data are from 2005, the most recent year available. One axis ranks states by the ratio of income received by that state from the federal government, per dollar of tax revenue paid to the federal government. Personally, I think the “red state / blue state” distinction is overdone. But to capture the widely felt tension between the heartland and the coastal urban centers, I have put on the other axis the ratio of votes for the Republican candidate versus the Democratic candidate in the most recent presidential election.

    It will come as a surprise to some, but not to others, that there is a fairly strong statistical relationship, but that the direction is the opposite from what you would think if you were listening to rhetoric from Republican conservatives: The red states (those that vote Republican) generally receive more subsidies from the federal government than they pay in taxes; in other words they are further to the right in the graph. It is the other way around with the blue states (those that vote Democratic).

    One reason is that the red states on average have lower population; thus their two Senators give them higher per capita representation in Washington than the blue states get, which translates into more federal handouts. As an example, the Pentagon has long wanted to shut down some military bases and discontinue some weapons systems that it does not regard as sufficiently useful, but is blocked by Senators or congressmen from the relevant districts; indeed defense contractors famously locate their factories in the districts of powerful congressmen for precisely this reason.

    The top ten feeders at the federal trough in 2005 were: New Mexico, Mississippi, Alaska, Louisiana, West Virginia, North Dakota, Alabama, South Dakota, Kentucky and Virginia. (Sarah Palin’s home state of Alaska ranks number one if measured in terms of federal spending per capita. Alabama Senator Shelby evidently gets goodies for his state, ranked 7, by indiscriminately holding up votes on administration appointments.) The top ten milk cows were: New Jersey, Nevada, Connecticut, Minnesota, Illinois, Delaware, California, New York, and Colorado.

    Perhaps in determining how the federal government redistributes income across states one should view its role more expansively than is captured in the budget numbers. In the western states there are federal water projects that subsidize water for farmers, artificially low grazing fees for ranchers, and leases for hard rock mining and oil drilling on federal lands that have historically charged artificially low prices. Perhaps the biggest federal redistribution program of all is massive agricultural subsidies. The four congressional districts that receive the most in farm subsidies are all represented by “conservative” Republicans, located in Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, and Texas. (Michele Bachmann’s family farm apparently received $250,000 in such farm payments between 1995 and 2006.)

    The most commonly ignored area of geographical redistribution is the federal government’s permanent policy of “universal service” in postal delivery, phone service and other utilities (electricity; perhaps now broadband…). Universal service means subsidizing those who choose to live in remote places like Alaska, where the cost of supplying these services is much higher than in the coastal cities. Perhaps they should move…

    If I were cynical, I might suspect that the reason that Glenn Beck, Michele Bachmann, and some Republicans are not enthusiastic about getting the most accurate numbers possible, from the census and otherwise, is that they don’t want people to know who is getting federal handouts and who is paying. But, more likely, the truth is that they don’t want to know themselves.
    Last edited by Havakasha; 11-16-2010 at 11:06 AM.

  4. #14
    Havakasha is offline
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    Red States Feed at Federal Trough, Blue States Supply the Feed

    Monday, September 27, 2004
    The Tax Foundation has released a fascinating report showing which states benefit from federal tax and spending policies, and which states foot the bill.
    The report shows that of the 32 states (and the District of Columbia) that are "winners" -- receiving more in federal spending than they pay in federal taxes -- 76% are Red States that voted for George Bush in 2000. Indeed, 17 of the 20 (85%) states receiving the most federal spending per dollar of federal taxes paid are Red States. Here are the Top 10 states that feed at the federal trough (with Red States highlighted in bold):

    States Receiving Most in Federal Spending Per Dollar of Federal Taxes Paid:
    1. D.C. ($6.17)
    2. North Dakota ($2.03)
    3. New Mexico ($1.89)
    4. Mississippi ($1.84)
    5. Alaska ($1.82)
    6. West Virginia ($1.74)
    7. Montana ($1.64)
    8. Alabama ($1.61)
    9. South Dakota ($1.59)
    10. Arkansas ($1.53)
    In contrast, of the 16 states that are "losers" -- receiving less in federal spending than they pay in federal taxes -- 69% are Blue States that voted for Al Gore in 2000. Indeed, 11 of the 14 (79%) of the states receiving the least federal spending per dollar of federal taxes paid are Blue States. Here are the Top 10 states that supply feed for the federal trough (with Blue States highlighted in bold):
    States Receiving Least in Federal Spending Per Dollar of Federal Taxes Paid:
    1. New Jersey ($0.62)
    2. Connecticut ($0.64)
    3. New Hampshire ($0.68)
    4. Nevada ($0.73)
    5. Illinois ($0.77)
    6. Minnesota ($0.77)
    7. Colorado ($0.79)
    8. Massachusetts ($0.79)
    9. California ($0.81)
    10. New York ($0.81)
    Two states -- Florida and Oregon (coincidentally, the two closest states in the 2000 Presidential election) -- received $1.00 in federal spending for each $1.00 in federal taxes paid.
    September 27, 2004 in Think Tank Reports | Permalink

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  5. #15
    SiriuslyLong is offline
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    Call your NY representative and senator. Tell them that you hate subsidizing Alaska and others with your tax dollars.

    I know what you are going for, and I'm not buying . Government redistributing to Government is not the same as Government making private citizens redistribute. Nice try though.

    But thanks for the info on why the states finances differ. It's complicated.

    I already cited the Tax Foundation data BTW.

  6. #16
    Atypical is offline
    Seems like some are reading this thread lately.

    For an update as to how a "red" state (Kansas) is doing with a libertarian religious psychopath in charge (Brownback) take a good long look at this state.

    Moderate Republicans were purged by him and because the state is seriously in deficit and losing sufficient money to run the state they are supporting the Democrat running against him.

    Economic myths never work. Don't be duped by propaganda.
    Last edited by Atypical; 11-02-2014 at 12:20 AM.

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